Category: Tax Tips and Tricks

Taxes are confusing and cause many taxpayers stress come tax season but PriorTax is here to help. Learn the tax tips and tricks to get you through the preparation process. You could be missing out on more money from the IRS which is why we want to help. We’ll let you know about hidden deductions and rare credits to report on your tax return to maximize your refund. Don’t hesitate to leave a comment on our blog if you have a question about your tax situation. Also, check back here for new tips and tricks throughout the tax season because our team is on the lookout!

Archive for the ‘Tax Tips and Tricks’ Category

20 Facts About Filing an Amended Prior Year Tax Return

Posted by admin on February 7, 2017
Last modified: February 7, 2017

Did you take the wrong step with your tax return? Don’t be too hard on yourself.

Mistakes happen. If you filed your tax return with incorrect or missing information, the IRS will give you a chance to fix your mishap. Before insisting you 100% need to amend your return, though, take a look at our list of when you should, when you shouldn’t, and other need-to-know info about doing so.

 

What it is and where to file

1.Another name for an amended tax return is 1040X.

2.If you are amending multiple tax returns at once, you will need a prepared 1040X for each one. They will also need to be mailed in separate envelopes to the IRS.

3.You can prepare your amended tax return with PriorTax whether you filed your original return with us or a different tax preparer.

4.The address to mail your amended tax return is:

Department of the Treasury

Internal Revenue Service

Austin, Texas 73301-0215

Or if you are using a private delivery service:

Internal Revenue Service

3651 South I-H 35, Stop 6055 AUSC

Austin, Texas 78741

 

Fixing Information VS. Adding Additional Information

5.You don’t need to file an amended return for calculation mistakes. The IRS has calculators of their own which will update the information automatically on your return. (more…)

Someone Used My Social Security Number to File Taxes – What Should I Do?

Posted by admin on January 10, 2017
Last modified: January 25, 2017

Victim of identity theft? Don’t let panic get the best of you.

After entering your tax information, you finally hit the e-file button, only to have your return rejected by the IRS. The reason; a tax return has already been filed with your social security number!

There’s a sinking feeling in your gut and an enveloping sense of dread. What do you do? How will you ever get your refund money now? Remain Calm. You’ll get through this.

 

Here’s what you should do now

Step #1

The first thing to do is double check all of the information on your return, especially your name and Social Security number and those of your spouse and dependents. Sometimes this error can be caused by a simple typo. (more…)

What Does Being Audited By The IRS Mean?

Posted by Michelle O'Brien on December 23, 2016
Last modified: December 23, 2016

Feel like the IRS has all eyes on you?

Think of filing your taxes as going through security at an airport. Your tax return is you. The security checkpoint is the IRS. Just like you can be stopped while going through security, your tax return can be stopped by the IRS. With a security checkpoint, you’re either stopped because you were the lucky number of the hour or because something triggered suspicion. The same goes for your tax return and the next step is an IRS audit.

 

What is an audit?

An audit is simply an examination of the information you reported on the tax return you filed for a specific year. Contrary to popular belief, the IRS is not employed with millions of accountants checking each return that comes through their doors. In fact, much of the processing is computerized now. You can imagine how technology can be manipulated a bit by fraud accounts and identity theft. Audits are necessary to help stop that from occurring as well.

 

What triggers your return for an audit?

Just like at the airport security check, the IRS can stop a tax return randomly or for suspicious activity. Here is a list of the most common audit triggers we’ve come across: (more…)

Filing Taxes in Two States: Working in NY & Living in NJ

Posted by admin on October 20, 2016
Last modified: November 2, 2016

If you’re living and working in different states, plan on filing taxes in two states.

For many, working and living in different states can save you a lot of money. This is especially true if you work in an expensive city like New York City.

The commute from New Jersey to the Big Apple may be much more attractive to you, especially if you’re looking for more space, lower costs and fewer people.

However, you’ll want to keep in mind that those who work and live in different states are required to file taxes in both states.

In other words, you’ll need to file both a New Jersey and New York state tax return.

File a nonresident NY state tax return and a resident NJ state return

If you’re working in a different state than you live in, you’re required tofile:

  • a non-resident state return to the state you work in
  • a resident state return to the state you live in
  • a federal tax return (more…)

The IRS Address to File Taxes

Posted by admin on October 18, 2016
Last modified: December 21, 2016

Mailing your tax return to the IRS? Don’t forget the stamp!

It’s 2016 and we are well into the era of e-file. In fact, the vast majority of taxpayers now send their return into the IRS electronically. However, there are some people out there who prefer to kick it old school and snail mail a paper copy of their return to the IRS. Alternately, if you are filing a late return from a prior year, snail mail is the only option.

So after you complete your return and breathe a big sigh of relief, make sure you know where you’re mailing your return. There’s nothing worse than scrambling to find out where to mail your return as the clock ticks down the final hours of the tax season.

Here is a list of each IRS address based on the state where you live. The list is complete with addresses of the IRS processing centers where you can mail your return whether you include a check or money order. (more…)

How to File Taxes without a W-2

Posted by admin on October 18, 2016
Last modified: November 2, 2016

It’s easy to lose your W-2 and just as simple to file without it.

E-filing your tax return these days is pretty straightforward. You just plug in the numbers on your W-2 to the online  tax application, take the credits and deductions you’re entitled to, and VOILA! Couldn’t be simpler.

But what happens if you don’t have a W-2? Suddenly things get a lot more complicated. Don’t worry. There are steps to take to make sure you get your tax return to the IRS.

Contact your employer

First thing’s first. Make every attempt to get the actual document itself. If your employer didn’t send you one, or sent you one that was incorrect, contact them and request that they send you the right one.

Employers are required to have W-2 forms issued to their employees by January 31. If you still don’t have it by then, it’s time to take additional action. At this point you should call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040 and tell them about your missing W-2. They will call your employer and tell them to send you the W-2.

(more…)

How to Get a Copy of Your W-2 Form for Prior Years

Posted by admin on October 18, 2016
Last modified: January 13, 2017

Ready to file your tax return but can’t find your W-2 form?

If you realized you lost a prior year W-2, there’s still hope. The process to get a copy of a W-2 can be fairly simple. In order to receive a copy of your prior year W-2, you have three options. After requesting the W-2 , create an account and start preparing your late tax return on Prior Tax.

Option #1: Get your W-2 from previous employer.

The easiest way to get a copy of a lost W-2, is to contact the employer who issued it.  The payroll department of your employer (or former employer) should be saving important tax information, such as W-2s. Ask for the W-2 to be sent to you.  This process is pretty simple and shouldn’t take much time.

Option #2: Get your W-2 from employer’s payroll provider.

Have you asked your employer for your W-2 and noticed that he mentally added the task to the very bottom of his To-Do list? If you know that your employer (or past employer) uses a payroll provider instead of calculating payroll in-office, skip the middleman and give the company a call yourself. When you call, be prepared to verify your SSN or employee number as they may ask for it. While speaking to the payroll provider, you may want to confirm the following:

  • Specify the year of the W-2 form that you need sent to you.
  • Verify the address they have on file for you. This is the address they will mail your W-2 to.
  • Ask how long it will take for them to mail your W-2 form.

Option #3: Get your W-2 from the IRS.

For an actual copy of your W-2 form, you will need to file form 4506 to the IRS with a $50 payment. This gets you a copy of your tax return along with your W-2. If you only need the federal information that was reported on your W-2 (not an actual copy), then you’ll file form 4506-T to the IRS for free. This provides you with a transcript of your tax return too. This alternative may be more time-consuming than reaching out to an employer. However, it requires NO hunting down of past employers to get them to spare a nano-second of their time.

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What Are Allowances on a W-4?

Posted by admin on October 18, 2016
Last modified: November 2, 2016

You must pay tax to the IRS but your W-4 form lets you decide when to pay it.

When beginning a new job, you may remember your employer handing over a W-4 form (along with the pile of other paperwork) to fill out. Your W-4 form determines how much tax is withheld from your income based on how many allowances you claim.
You can claim a certain number of allowances depending on your life situation. Allowances conclude how little or how much your employer will withhold from your paychecks throughout the year for taxes. In other words, the size of your tax refund or tax due to the IRS after filing your taxesYou can claim as little as zero allowances or as many as apply to you and your tax situation. The ideal situation is to break even; no tax owed and no tax refund.

How many allowances should you claim?

The details to your specific situation (such as your filing status, number of children, etc.) will determine how you complete your W-4.

If your parents claim you: 

If you’re being claimed as a dependent on someone else’s tax return, you’ll most likely want to claim zero allowances. This is because your parents are claiming you as an exemption, rather than you claiming yourself.

(more…)

How to Determine Your W-4 Allowances

Posted by admin on October 18, 2016
Last modified: November 2, 2016

Confused about how to fill out your W-4 form?

If you’re completing your W-4 form and have no idea how many allowances to claim, you’re not alone. That being said, it’s important to be aware of the number of allowances you’re claiming to avoid a large tax bill after filing.

The W-4 form determines how much tax is withheld from your paycheck each pay period. That means, if there is too much tax withheld throughout the year, you’ll end up receiving a tax refund when filing your taxes. The opposite is also true. If too little tax is withheld from your paycheck, you’ll end up having to pay taxes later on.

What determines the number of allowances to claim?

The number of allowances you claim on your W-4 is dependent on your life circumstances. It depends on the number of jobs you have, if you’re married or single and how many children and personal exemptions you have along with your stance in the federal tax table.

(more…)

Where Is My State Tax Refund?

Posted by Michelle O'Brien on October 17, 2016
Last modified: November 2, 2016

Check the status of your state tax refund online

For all our kvetching, the IRS is *usually* pretty good about sending out tax refunds in a timely manner. In other countries, Australia for example, it’s not uncommon to hear of people waiting 20 or even 30 weeks for their tax refunds.

But state tax refunds can be different from the IRS. They often arrive well behind your federal tax refund which, depending on your perspective, can constitute either be a pleasant surprise or an agonizing wait. If you haven’t file your state taxes yet, you can do so (along with your federal taxes) on PriorTax.

Here’s how long you can expect to wait for your state tax refund and how to check its status:

  • Alabama state refund – With your social security number and refund amount you can check your refund status on the Alabama Department of Revenue website. (more…)